Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Pin It
Feed Feed

Dec 21, 201012:00 AMIt's All About Content

with Thomas Marks

Fastballs, Toupees and Rivalries

Fastballs, Toupees and Rivalries

Thomas Marks brings years of marketing experience to his blog "It's All About Content" as the President and Managing Partner of TMA+Peritus. Prior to starting the agency in 1983, Tom was the VP of Marketing and Advertising for Bally Corporation in Chicago. He was also President of Bally's multi-million dollar in-house ad agency FFC Advertising.

I like baseball, but not as much as tackle football, college basketball and the NBA. Still, we recently lost two great ball players who had nothing in common, or did they? The actions of Ron Santo and Bob Feller on and off the field were quite remarkable — now I'm left trying to figure out if their actions spoke louder than their words, or their words spoke louder than their actions.

Ron Santo died at the age of 70; many say that his wig died along side him at the age of 30. He battled juvenile diabetes as a teenager and later in life lost both legs to the disease. I'm not a stat-boy but my stat-boy boys tell me there's no shortage of third baseman in the Hall of Fame with numbers less compelling than Santo's. Although Ronnie didn't exactly speak the King's English, it was the St. Louis Cardinals that rocked his kingdom. "When you walked on the field, you felt like playing baseball. The electricity, the atmosphere, and it was always good baseball. Because it was the Cardinals, you always moved to another level. I think both teams did that. And the fans are just like Cubs fans, very knowledgeable," said Santo.

I like rivalries, they work well in sports, but less so in politics, marriage and gangs. Bob Feller was no different when it came to you know who. He famously said, "I would rather beat the Yankees regularly than pitch a no hit game." Well, not much has changed there. Feller died at the age of 92, had a phenomenal career, and like Ted Williams, served his country in the military at the height of his awesomeness. He went on to say, "Sympathy is something that shouldn't be bestowed upon the Yankees. Apparently it angers them." There aren't too many people around these parts who would be sympathetic to the pinstripes, Bullet Bob.

What these two guys might have had in common, after all, was that their words probably outweighed their actions. Ronnie wouldn't just approach a kid battling diabetes and tell him not to give up. He would spend 10 to 15 minutes telling him about nutrition, blood sugar and the good life that awaits them. Feller, in the office season, would barnstorm the country playing in exhibition games with stars from the Negro League like Satchel Paige. And he would talk to them and travel with the players — this before the great Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier.

Now that I think about it, words really do support a person's actions. Or is it the other way around?

Sign up for the free IB Update — your weekly resource for local business news, analysis, voices and the names you need to know. Click here.

Add your comment:
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Pin It
Feed Feed
Edit Module

About This Blog

Thomas Marks brings years of marketing experience to his blog "It's All About Content" as the President and Managing Partner of TMA+Peritus.  Prior to starting the agency in 1983, Tom was the VP of Marketing and Advertising for Bally Corporation in Chicago. He was also President of Bally's multi-million dollar in-house ad agency FFC Advertising.

Recent Posts

Archives

Feed

Atom Feed Subscribe to the It's All About Content Feed »

Edit Module