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Mar 16, 201512:49 PMTaking Stock

with Nathan Brinkman

Points to consider if your retirement goal seems out of reach

(page 1 of 2)

Each year in its annual Retirement Confidence Survey, the Employee Benefit Research Institute reiterates that goal-setting is a key factor influencing overall retirement confidence. But for many, a retirement savings goal that could reach $1 million or more may seem like a daunting, even impossible, mountain to climb.

What if you’re investing as much as you can but still feel that you’ll never reach the summit? As with many of life’s toughest challenges, it may help to focus less on the big picture and more on the details. Start by reviewing the following points.

1. Retirement goals are based on assumptions

Whether you use a simple online calculator or run a detailed analysis, your retirement savings goal is based on certain assumptions that will, in all likelihood, change. Inflation, rates of return, life expectancies, salary adjustments, retirement expenses, Social Security benefits — all of these factors are estimates. That’s why it’s so important to review your retirement savings goal and its underlying assumptions regularly — at least once per year and when life events occur. This will help ensure that your goal continues to reflect your changing life circumstances as well as market and economic conditions.

2. You need to break it down

Instead of viewing your goal as one big number, try to break it down into an anticipated monthly income need. That way you can view this monthly need alongside your estimated monthly Social Security benefit, income from your retirement savings, and any pension or other income you expect. This can help the planning process seem less daunting, more realistic, and most importantly, more manageable. It can be far less overwhelming to brainstorm ways to close a gap of, say, a few hundred dollars a month than a few hundred thousand dollars over the duration of your retirement.

(Continued)

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