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Sep 5, 201701:27 PM#SocialBiz

with Spencer X. Smith

The one secret you need to know to get great customer reviews

(page 1 of 2)

When is your customer’s enthusiasm the highest? After a great experience, right? After you’ve done something awesome, your customer WANTS to support you and tell other people. This same method applies to those of us who want great reviews and testimonials, too. My rock band taught me this lesson many years ago, and this idea applies to every industry. So what’s the secret to great customer reviews and how can you ask for them immediately?

Think of the last time you went to a concert for an up-and-coming band. On the way out the door, after you experienced a (hopefully) great performance, you walked by the merchandise table — commonly known as a merch booth. That’s the place where the performers will sell CDs, clothing, posters, and the like. Many times, they’ll be there to autograph the merchandise and chitchat with fans too. At this point, fans will “vote” on how they feel about the band’s performance by spending money — or not — on merch.

Why do the performers go to the merchandise table immediately after the show? That’s when the fans are still experiencing the afterglow of the concert. This is the absolute best time for someone to purchase something from you, and it will generally be the highest price you can charge for your merchandise, too. The “half-life” of this enthusiasm is extremely short, and is almost non-existent after a week or so.

Our rock band first performed at Summerfest in Milwaukee in 2002 on the stage in the picture. The flow of fans in and out of the stage bottlenecks at one specific point marked by the red arrow. Naturally, this is where the band sets up their merchandise table. Summerfest wants to attract great bands to play at their festival, and if the band sells a lot of merchandise everyone is happy. This setup is no accident.

“Okay,” you might be thinking, “ but I’m not in a business where a performance can sell something for me.” You’re wrong. In your business, you’re “performing” constantly. Any time you’re in the presence of your customers, your interactions with them are being judged and their impression will influence others. These performances can help you ensure future revenue by letting the world know your customers are happy. After that interaction concludes ask immediately for feedback, and if it’s positive request a great review from that customer. What’s the key here, though? You need to ask immediately.

When your customers have a great experience, ask them right away to complete the review on the phone they’re carrying with them, and request they use whatever ratings site you feel is most pertinent to your customers. We all need to use technology to our advantage in this respect. Since everyone is connected to the web constantly, how much time will it take your customer to do the review? Sixty to 90 seconds, maybe? The secret to a great customer review in this case: being front of mind. Once he or she gets home — or even back into their car — the likelihood of a review dwindles substantially.

(Continued)

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About This Blog

Spencer Smith is the founder of spencerXsmith.com and co-founder of AmpliPhi, a Madison, WI-based digital marketing agency. He’s an instructor at the University of Wisconsin and adjunct faculty at Rutgers University, where he teaches classes on Social Media Strategy.

He’s been called a "Digital Marketing Expert" by Forbes and was the winner of the 2016 In Business magazine Executive Choice Award for Social Media Consulting Company. Spencer speaks at an average of 60 conferences and events per year and only teaches what he has first proven to work himself with his own business.

He has been featured and quoted in Money magazine, Entrepreneur, Inc. magazine, Costco Connection, and dozens of other publications. He also writes columns for IBMadison.com, The Huffington Post, The American Bar Association, and Law Journal Newsletters.

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