Edit Module
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Pin It
Feed Feed

Jan 2, 201811:55 AMOpen Mic

Send us your blog for consideration!

4 big bad sales myths of 2018

(page 1 of 2)

I recently had the opportunity to debunk a few myths about wolves. I visited the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Preserve and came face to face with some misconceptions. Our culture is permeated with tales of the Big Bad Wolf, leading to widespread hunting of these animals to the point of endangerment. The reality is that people have nothing to fear from wolves. My experience with a particularly friendly wolf, Micah, got me thinking about how, in sales, we sometimes constrain ourselves with limiting beliefs, or myths, and the New Year is the perfect time to debunk these falsehoods and rethink how you are going to approach sales in 2018.

Myth #1: Expertise is the source of our credibility. Most of us are all too eager to demonstrate our product and business knowledge and quickly take control of a customer interaction to demonstrate expertise. We believe this will help our clients trust and buy from us. However, as Amy Cuddy finds in her recent book Presence, competence is only part of what compels trust — and it’s the lesser part!

Before clients consider our competence or expertise there’s something else they’re looking for: warmth. Are we real? Are we authentic? Unfortunately, the more we hammer our amazing expertise, the less authentic we appear. Micah reminded me of this. While heavily socialized he’s very much a wild animal, and I was entering his turf. Whether he would give me any attention was entirely up to him. What made all the difference for Micah and me was my effort to engage with him on his terms. I didn’t try to show him my alpha experience. I met him at his level (literally), and the reward was something I’ll never forget.

I spoke the other day with an account management team from a leading mortgage technology firm, and they approached a recent client meeting in a similar fashion. They went in without an agenda except to talk with the customer about their business. The client responded by openly sharing information about two key initiatives that led to new opportunities. The team reported their delight in what felt like a “natural” and “authentic” meeting, and were eager to experiment with more clients.

Give less weight to expertise in your next meeting and see what happens. Your clients will respond, just like Micah did.

Myth #2: The customer is always right. Today our customers are much further along in their buying decision by the time we talk to them. This makes our job a lot harder because, thanks to many online resources, customers are much better informed and often have their eyes on a specific solution. But that doesn’t make them right, no matter how sophisticated a buyer they are. If we slip into order-taking mode, we end up in commodity-ville, talking about a limited solution that can be easily compared to the competition. However, if we press for more discovery, we’re almost certain to find that the client’s definition of the problem is limited or even incorrect. To the extent we can reframe the customer’s certainty and fixation we graduate from “problem solver” — just like every other vendor who calls on them — to the more coveted and differentiated “problem finder” role.

(Continued)

Add your comment:
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Pin It
Feed Feed
Edit Module

About This Blog

Make your voice heard with IB's "Open Mic." Send your blog entry to Online Editor Jason Busch at jason@ibmadison.com for consideration.

Archives

Feed

Atom Feed Subscribe to the Open Mic Feed »

Recent Posts

Edit Module