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Law at Work

with Jessica M. Kramer and Ashlie B. Johnson

09/20/16

Employee breaks: Myths dispelled

The ins and outs of providing breaks at work for employees might seem obvious, but there are some things to consider before you find yourself with bigger problems than hungry workers with rumbling stomachs. Here are two frequently held beliefs, or myths, about employee breaks and the truth about what's required of you, the employer.

Posted at 12:44 PM | Permalink | Comments

07/12/16

If I terminate an employee after a 90-day probationary period, do I still have to pay unemployment insurance?

Contrary to popular belief, a probationary status has no bearing on whether an employer has to pay. Whether an employer plans on having its employee work for a week, a month, or long-term, the employer is required to pay unemployment insurance on that employee and may be liable for benefits that employee later draws if he or she becomes unemployed. Aside from a very few special exceptions, employers with one or more employees (part-time or full-time) are subject to unemployment insurance laws.

Posted at 12:47 PM | Permalink | Comments

05/31/16

Will you have to start paying your salaried employee $47,500 a year?

Raise your hand if you thought that paying your employee a salary over the minimum salary level (currently $23,660 a year, or $455 a week) made the employee exempt from (or not eligible for) overtime? Be honest. There are many of you out there.

Posted at 12:24 PM | Permalink | Comments

04/07/16

Employers: Are you making these common I-9 mistakes?

If you have employees and you read this headline and are saying to yourself, “What is an I-9?,” that likely means one of two things: (a) you don’t know/remember the name of the form you complete for new employees which documents their authorization to work in the U.S., or (b) you are not complying with the federal law requiring that such things be documented.

Posted at 12:44 PM | Permalink | Comments

03/18/16

Use CCAP for background checking? You might want to think twice …

In Wisconsin, over the last decade or so, ‘CCAPing’ (pronounced ‘see-capping’) has become a verb. It’s how many of us check someone out, whether it be a friend, that creepy neighbor, our boyfriend’s crazy ex-girlfriend, a potential suitor, or a potential employee. Stop right there. Did you say potential employee? If you’ve ever CCAPed a potential employee, or thought about it, then the warning in this article is for you.

Posted at 01:15 AM | Permalink | Comments

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About This Blog

Jessica M. Kramer is a partner at Kramer, Elkins & Watt LLC in Madison and writes about employment law. At KEW she handles employment law matters for businesses and individuals, and represents landlords in all aspects of landlord-tenant law. Jessica received her undergraduate degree from UW–Madison in 2000 and her Juris Doctor from the UW Law School in 2004.

 Ashlie B. Johnson, PHR, is the owner of Brooke Human Resource Solutions, serving the Dane County area. BrookeHR operates as an independent HR contracting resource for small businesses, providing a wide range of support as well as policy language, documentation, and employment agreements that meet today’s complex compliance standards. Ashlie received her B.S. in Human Resource Management from St. Cloud State University in 2002 and has been a certified PHR since 2007.

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